Allied Journal


Three Russian judges charged with corruption
26 Jul 2005

The Russian Supreme Court has convicted three federal judges of fraud for illegally expropriating more than 100 flats in the Moscow region.

The court said the judges had all belonged to the same criminal gang, and requested sentences of at least 12 years for each of the convicted.

The properties were stolen when their owners died without leaving a will or other legal instructions.

The Russian legal system is plagued by corruption, but high-profile cases involving judges are rare.

Reform of the judiciary has been painfully slow, despite President Vladimir Putin's calls for urgent change, and it is still said to be too influenced by political pressure, our correspondent says.

Many elderly people found themselves homeless during the ill-fated first round of housing privatisation a decade ago, their homes effectively seized by gangsters in league with corrupt officials, he says.

In the absence of clear and easily enforceable laws, Moscow still sees struggles - sometimes violent - for ownership of lucrative land or real estate, our correspondent reports.
The Russian Supreme Court has convicted three federal judges of fraud for illegally expropriating more than 100 flats in the Moscow region.

The court said the judges had all belonged to the same criminal gang, and requested sentences of at least 12 years for each of the convicted.

The properties were stolen when their owners died without leaving a will or other legal instructions.

The Russian legal system is plagued by corruption, but high-profile cases involving judges are rare.

Reform of the judiciary has been painfully slow, despite President Vladimir Putin's calls for urgent change, and it is still said to be too influenced by political pressure, our correspondent says.

Many elderly people found themselves homeless during the ill-fated first round of housing privatisation a decade ago, their homes effectively seized by gangsters in league with corrupt officials, he says.

In the absence of clear and easily enforceable laws, Moscow still sees struggles - sometimes violent - for ownership of lucrative land or real estate, our correspondent reports.


 

 


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